Ongoing Known Issues with RefWorks

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There are currently a number of known ongoing issues with using RefWorks so when using RefWorks to organise your references and create reference lists and bibliographies please make sure to check out the known issues page on the RefWorks guide:

Take a look at the page by following this link.

The issues on this page are being investigated by various parties such as RefWorks themselves and EBSCOHost and we will update when we know more.

In addition please note that RefWorks is a tool to help you with your referencing and you will always need to check that any citations and your reference list or bibliography comply with RGU Harvard or Vancouver guidelines before submitting assignments, dissertations etc.

New version of the RGU Vancouver referencing guide

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Do you use the RGU Vancouver referencing style?

We are currently testing a new version of the RGU Vancouver referencing guide.  It includes all the current content plus additional examples and a new Frequently Asked Questions section.

We would very much welcome your comments on the new guide to libclient@rgu.ac.uk.  You can access it here.

Please remember that the new guide is still in draft form and continue to use the existing version  for our definitive advice.

RefWorks Guide – Known Issues Section Created

As there are currently a number of known issues with using RefWorks we have created a page on the main RefWorks guide that includes information about them along with any solutions that we have identified for the problems.

Take a look at the page by following this link.

The issues on this page are being investigated by various parties such as RefWorks themselves and EBSCOHost and we will update when we know more.

Harvard help: what is secondary referencing?

What should you do if you have read a book, article or webpage that has referenced or quoted a good point from another work and you would like to use that point in your essay?  This is called secondary referencing.

Let’s say you have read a book published in 2014 and the author is Smith.  It cites a good point by someone called Jones.

You can make the situation clear in your text by writing something like:

Jones (cited in Smith 2014) notes that referencing can be fun.

If you are using a direct quote don’t forget a page number:

Jones (cited in Smith 2014 p. 23) argues that “referencing is the most fun you can ever have”.

In your reference list you must include a full reference for the book by Smith:

SMITH, J., 2014. Referencing and the meaning of life. Aberdeen: Library Press.

You do NOT include a reference for Jones as you must only reference what you have read (the item by Smith).

For information on all aspects of RGU Harvard referencing please check out our guide.

Extra Harvard Referencing classes added

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Due to the popularity of our Harvard Referencing classes last week and over the next couple of weeks we have added a couple of additional classes to our programme.

They are running on:

Friday 16th October 14.00-15.00

Monday 19th October 11.00-12.00

And you can sign up for them by following the links above or by going to the main timetable.

Of course if these times do not work for you please take a look through the timetable as we run the classes on different days and times throughout the whole of the semester.